pub struct AllowedUrl(Url);
Expand description

Wrapper for URLs which are allowed to be loaded

SVG files can reference other files (PNG/JPEG images, other SVGs, CSS files, etc.). This object is constructed by checking whether a specified href (a possibly-relative filename, for example) should be allowed to be loaded, given the base URL of the SVG being loaded.

Tuple Fields§

§0: Url

Methods from Deref<Target = Url>§

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pub fn join(&self, input: &str) -> Result<Url, ParseError>

Parse a string as an URL, with this URL as the base URL.

The inverse of this is make_relative.

Note: a trailing slash is significant. Without it, the last path component is considered to be a “file” name to be removed to get at the “directory” that is used as the base:

§Examples
use url::Url;

let base = Url::parse("https://example.net/a/b.html")?;
let url = base.join("c.png")?;
assert_eq!(url.as_str(), "https://example.net/a/c.png");  // Not /a/b.html/c.png

let base = Url::parse("https://example.net/a/b/")?;
let url = base.join("c.png")?;
assert_eq!(url.as_str(), "https://example.net/a/b/c.png");
§Errors

If the function can not parse an URL from the given string with this URL as the base URL, a ParseError variant will be returned.

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pub fn make_relative(&self, url: &Url) -> Option<String>

Creates a relative URL if possible, with this URL as the base URL.

This is the inverse of join.

§Examples
use url::Url;

let base = Url::parse("https://example.net/a/b.html")?;
let url = Url::parse("https://example.net/a/c.png")?;
let relative = base.make_relative(&url);
assert_eq!(relative.as_ref().map(|s| s.as_str()), Some("c.png"));

let base = Url::parse("https://example.net/a/b/")?;
let url = Url::parse("https://example.net/a/b/c.png")?;
let relative = base.make_relative(&url);
assert_eq!(relative.as_ref().map(|s| s.as_str()), Some("c.png"));

let base = Url::parse("https://example.net/a/b/")?;
let url = Url::parse("https://example.net/a/d/c.png")?;
let relative = base.make_relative(&url);
assert_eq!(relative.as_ref().map(|s| s.as_str()), Some("../d/c.png"));

let base = Url::parse("https://example.net/a/b.html?c=d")?;
let url = Url::parse("https://example.net/a/b.html?e=f")?;
let relative = base.make_relative(&url);
assert_eq!(relative.as_ref().map(|s| s.as_str()), Some("?e=f"));
§Errors

If this URL can’t be a base for the given URL, None is returned. This is for example the case if the scheme, host or port are not the same.

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pub fn as_str(&self) -> &str

Return the serialization of this URL.

This is fast since that serialization is already stored in the Url struct.

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url_str = "https://example.net/";
let url = Url::parse(url_str)?;
assert_eq!(url.as_str(), url_str);
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pub fn origin(&self) -> Origin

Return the origin of this URL (https://url.spec.whatwg.org/#origin)

Note: this returns an opaque origin for file: URLs, which causes url.origin() != url.origin().

§Examples

URL with ftp scheme:

use url::{Host, Origin, Url};

let url = Url::parse("ftp://example.com/foo")?;
assert_eq!(url.origin(),
           Origin::Tuple("ftp".into(),
                         Host::Domain("example.com".into()),
                         21));

URL with blob scheme:

use url::{Host, Origin, Url};

let url = Url::parse("blob:https://example.com/foo")?;
assert_eq!(url.origin(),
           Origin::Tuple("https".into(),
                         Host::Domain("example.com".into()),
                         443));

URL with file scheme:

use url::{Host, Origin, Url};

let url = Url::parse("file:///tmp/foo")?;
assert!(!url.origin().is_tuple());

let other_url = Url::parse("file:///tmp/foo")?;
assert!(url.origin() != other_url.origin());

URL with other scheme:

use url::{Host, Origin, Url};

let url = Url::parse("foo:bar")?;
assert!(!url.origin().is_tuple());
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pub fn scheme(&self) -> &str

Return the scheme of this URL, lower-cased, as an ASCII string without the ‘:’ delimiter.

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("file:///tmp/foo")?;
assert_eq!(url.scheme(), "file");
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pub fn is_special(&self) -> bool

Return whether the URL is special (has a special scheme)

§Examples
use url::Url;

assert!(Url::parse("http:///tmp/foo")?.is_special());
assert!(Url::parse("file:///tmp/foo")?.is_special());
assert!(!Url::parse("moz:///tmp/foo")?.is_special());
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pub fn has_authority(&self) -> bool

Return whether the URL has an ‘authority’, which can contain a username, password, host, and port number.

URLs that do not are either path-only like unix:/run/foo.socket or cannot-be-a-base like data:text/plain,Stuff.

See also the authority method.

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("ftp://rms@example.com")?;
assert!(url.has_authority());

let url = Url::parse("unix:/run/foo.socket")?;
assert!(!url.has_authority());

let url = Url::parse("data:text/plain,Stuff")?;
assert!(!url.has_authority());
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pub fn authority(&self) -> &str

Return the authority of this URL as an ASCII string.

Non-ASCII domains are punycode-encoded per IDNA if this is the host of a special URL, or percent encoded for non-special URLs. IPv6 addresses are given between [ and ] brackets. Ports are omitted if they match the well known port of a special URL.

Username and password are percent-encoded.

See also the has_authority method.

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("unix:/run/foo.socket")?;
assert_eq!(url.authority(), "");
let url = Url::parse("file:///tmp/foo")?;
assert_eq!(url.authority(), "");
let url = Url::parse("https://user:password@example.com/tmp/foo")?;
assert_eq!(url.authority(), "user:password@example.com");
let url = Url::parse("irc://àlex.рф.example.com:6667/foo")?;
assert_eq!(url.authority(), "%C3%A0lex.%D1%80%D1%84.example.com:6667");
let url = Url::parse("http://àlex.рф.example.com:80/foo")?;
assert_eq!(url.authority(), "xn--lex-8ka.xn--p1ai.example.com");
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pub fn cannot_be_a_base(&self) -> bool

Return whether this URL is a cannot-be-a-base URL, meaning that parsing a relative URL string with this URL as the base will return an error.

This is the case if the scheme and : delimiter are not followed by a / slash, as is typically the case of data: and mailto: URLs.

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("ftp://rms@example.com")?;
assert!(!url.cannot_be_a_base());

let url = Url::parse("unix:/run/foo.socket")?;
assert!(!url.cannot_be_a_base());

let url = Url::parse("data:text/plain,Stuff")?;
assert!(url.cannot_be_a_base());
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pub fn username(&self) -> &str

Return the username for this URL (typically the empty string) as a percent-encoded ASCII string.

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("ftp://rms@example.com")?;
assert_eq!(url.username(), "rms");

let url = Url::parse("ftp://:secret123@example.com")?;
assert_eq!(url.username(), "");

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com")?;
assert_eq!(url.username(), "");
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pub fn password(&self) -> Option<&str>

Return the password for this URL, if any, as a percent-encoded ASCII string.

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("ftp://rms:secret123@example.com")?;
assert_eq!(url.password(), Some("secret123"));

let url = Url::parse("ftp://:secret123@example.com")?;
assert_eq!(url.password(), Some("secret123"));

let url = Url::parse("ftp://rms@example.com")?;
assert_eq!(url.password(), None);

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com")?;
assert_eq!(url.password(), None);
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pub fn has_host(&self) -> bool

Equivalent to url.host().is_some().

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("ftp://rms@example.com")?;
assert!(url.has_host());

let url = Url::parse("unix:/run/foo.socket")?;
assert!(!url.has_host());

let url = Url::parse("data:text/plain,Stuff")?;
assert!(!url.has_host());
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pub fn host_str(&self) -> Option<&str>

Return the string representation of the host (domain or IP address) for this URL, if any.

Non-ASCII domains are punycode-encoded per IDNA if this is the host of a special URL, or percent encoded for non-special URLs. IPv6 addresses are given between [ and ] brackets.

Cannot-be-a-base URLs (typical of data: and mailto:) and some file: URLs don’t have a host.

See also the host method.

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("https://127.0.0.1/index.html")?;
assert_eq!(url.host_str(), Some("127.0.0.1"));

let url = Url::parse("ftp://rms@example.com")?;
assert_eq!(url.host_str(), Some("example.com"));

let url = Url::parse("unix:/run/foo.socket")?;
assert_eq!(url.host_str(), None);

let url = Url::parse("data:text/plain,Stuff")?;
assert_eq!(url.host_str(), None);
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pub fn host(&self) -> Option<Host<&str>>

Return the parsed representation of the host for this URL. Non-ASCII domain labels are punycode-encoded per IDNA if this is the host of a special URL, or percent encoded for non-special URLs.

Cannot-be-a-base URLs (typical of data: and mailto:) and some file: URLs don’t have a host.

See also the host_str method.

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("https://127.0.0.1/index.html")?;
assert!(url.host().is_some());

let url = Url::parse("ftp://rms@example.com")?;
assert!(url.host().is_some());

let url = Url::parse("unix:/run/foo.socket")?;
assert!(url.host().is_none());

let url = Url::parse("data:text/plain,Stuff")?;
assert!(url.host().is_none());
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pub fn domain(&self) -> Option<&str>

If this URL has a host and it is a domain name (not an IP address), return it. Non-ASCII domains are punycode-encoded per IDNA if this is the host of a special URL, or percent encoded for non-special URLs.

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("https://127.0.0.1/")?;
assert_eq!(url.domain(), None);

let url = Url::parse("mailto:rms@example.net")?;
assert_eq!(url.domain(), None);

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com/")?;
assert_eq!(url.domain(), Some("example.com"));
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pub fn port(&self) -> Option<u16>

Return the port number for this URL, if any.

Note that default port numbers are never reflected by the serialization, use the port_or_known_default() method if you want a default port number returned.

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com")?;
assert_eq!(url.port(), None);

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com:443/")?;
assert_eq!(url.port(), None);

let url = Url::parse("ssh://example.com:22")?;
assert_eq!(url.port(), Some(22));
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pub fn port_or_known_default(&self) -> Option<u16>

Return the port number for this URL, or the default port number if it is known.

This method only knows the default port number of the http, https, ws, wss and ftp schemes.

For URLs in these schemes, this method always returns Some(_). For other schemes, it is the same as Url::port().

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("foo://example.com")?;
assert_eq!(url.port_or_known_default(), None);

let url = Url::parse("foo://example.com:1456")?;
assert_eq!(url.port_or_known_default(), Some(1456));

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com")?;
assert_eq!(url.port_or_known_default(), Some(443));
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pub fn socket_addrs( &self, default_port_number: impl Fn() -> Option<u16> ) -> Result<Vec<SocketAddr>, Error>

Resolve a URL’s host and port number to SocketAddr.

If the URL has the default port number of a scheme that is unknown to this library, default_port_number provides an opportunity to provide the actual port number. In non-example code this should be implemented either simply as || None, or by matching on the URL’s .scheme().

If the host is a domain, it is resolved using the standard library’s DNS support.

§Examples
let url = url::Url::parse("https://example.net/").unwrap();
let addrs = url.socket_addrs(|| None).unwrap();
std::net::TcpStream::connect(&*addrs)
/// With application-specific known default port numbers
fn socket_addrs(url: url::Url) -> std::io::Result<Vec<std::net::SocketAddr>> {
    url.socket_addrs(|| match url.scheme() {
        "socks5" | "socks5h" => Some(1080),
        _ => None,
    })
}
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pub fn path(&self) -> &str

Return the path for this URL, as a percent-encoded ASCII string. For cannot-be-a-base URLs, this is an arbitrary string that doesn’t start with ‘/’. For other URLs, this starts with a ‘/’ slash and continues with slash-separated path segments.

§Examples
use url::{Url, ParseError};

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com/api/versions?page=2")?;
assert_eq!(url.path(), "/api/versions");

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com")?;
assert_eq!(url.path(), "/");

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com/countries/việt nam")?;
assert_eq!(url.path(), "/countries/vi%E1%BB%87t%20nam");
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pub fn path_segments(&self) -> Option<Split<'_, char>>

Unless this URL is cannot-be-a-base, return an iterator of ‘/’ slash-separated path segments, each as a percent-encoded ASCII string.

Return None for cannot-be-a-base URLs.

When Some is returned, the iterator always contains at least one string (which may be empty).

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com/foo/bar")?;
let mut path_segments = url.path_segments().ok_or_else(|| "cannot be base")?;
assert_eq!(path_segments.next(), Some("foo"));
assert_eq!(path_segments.next(), Some("bar"));
assert_eq!(path_segments.next(), None);

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com")?;
let mut path_segments = url.path_segments().ok_or_else(|| "cannot be base")?;
assert_eq!(path_segments.next(), Some(""));
assert_eq!(path_segments.next(), None);

let url = Url::parse("data:text/plain,HelloWorld")?;
assert!(url.path_segments().is_none());

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com/countries/việt nam")?;
let mut path_segments = url.path_segments().ok_or_else(|| "cannot be base")?;
assert_eq!(path_segments.next(), Some("countries"));
assert_eq!(path_segments.next(), Some("vi%E1%BB%87t%20nam"));
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pub fn query(&self) -> Option<&str>

Return this URL’s query string, if any, as a percent-encoded ASCII string.

§Examples
use url::Url;

fn run() -> Result<(), ParseError> {
let url = Url::parse("https://example.com/products?page=2")?;
let query = url.query();
assert_eq!(query, Some("page=2"));

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com/products")?;
let query = url.query();
assert!(query.is_none());

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com/?country=español")?;
let query = url.query();
assert_eq!(query, Some("country=espa%C3%B1ol"));
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pub fn query_pairs(&self) -> Parse<'_>

Parse the URL’s query string, if any, as application/x-www-form-urlencoded and return an iterator of (key, value) pairs.

§Examples
use std::borrow::Cow;

use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com/products?page=2&sort=desc")?;
let mut pairs = url.query_pairs();

assert_eq!(pairs.count(), 2);

assert_eq!(pairs.next(), Some((Cow::Borrowed("page"), Cow::Borrowed("2"))));
assert_eq!(pairs.next(), Some((Cow::Borrowed("sort"), Cow::Borrowed("desc"))));
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pub fn fragment(&self) -> Option<&str>

Return this URL’s fragment identifier, if any.

A fragment is the part of the URL after the # symbol. The fragment is optional and, if present, contains a fragment identifier that identifies a secondary resource, such as a section heading of a document.

In HTML, the fragment identifier is usually the id attribute of a an element that is scrolled to on load. Browsers typically will not send the fragment portion of a URL to the server.

Note: the parser did not percent-encode this component, but the input may have been percent-encoded already.

§Examples
use url::Url;

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com/data.csv#row=4")?;

assert_eq!(url.fragment(), Some("row=4"));

let url = Url::parse("https://example.com/data.csv#cell=4,1-6,2")?;

assert_eq!(url.fragment(), Some("cell=4,1-6,2"));
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pub fn to_file_path(&self) -> Result<PathBuf, ()>

Assuming the URL is in the file scheme or similar, convert its path to an absolute std::path::Path.

Note: This does not actually check the URL’s scheme, and may give nonsensical results for other schemes. It is the user’s responsibility to check the URL’s scheme before calling this.

let path = url.to_file_path();

Returns Err if the host is neither empty nor "localhost" (except on Windows, where file: URLs may have a non-local host), or if Path::new_opt() returns None. (That is, if the percent-decoded path contains a NUL byte or, for a Windows path, is not UTF-8.)

Trait Implementations§

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impl Clone for AllowedUrl

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fn clone(&self) -> AllowedUrl

Returns a copy of the value. Read more
1.0.0 · source§

fn clone_from(&mut self, source: &Self)

Performs copy-assignment from source. Read more
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impl Debug for AllowedUrl

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fn fmt(&self, f: &mut Formatter<'_>) -> Result

Formats the value using the given formatter. Read more
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impl Deref for AllowedUrl

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type Target = Url

The resulting type after dereferencing.
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fn deref(&self) -> &Url

Dereferences the value.
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impl Display for AllowedUrl

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fn fmt(&self, f: &mut Formatter<'_>) -> Result

Formats the value using the given formatter. Read more
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impl Hash for AllowedUrl

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fn hash<__H: Hasher>(&self, state: &mut __H)

Feeds this value into the given Hasher. Read more
1.3.0 · source§

fn hash_slice<H>(data: &[Self], state: &mut H)
where H: Hasher, Self: Sized,

Feeds a slice of this type into the given Hasher. Read more
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impl PartialEq for AllowedUrl

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fn eq(&self, other: &AllowedUrl) -> bool

This method tests for self and other values to be equal, and is used by ==.
1.0.0 · source§

fn ne(&self, other: &Rhs) -> bool

This method tests for !=. The default implementation is almost always sufficient, and should not be overridden without very good reason.
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impl Eq for AllowedUrl

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impl StructuralPartialEq for AllowedUrl

Auto Trait Implementations§

Blanket Implementations§

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impl<T> Any for T
where T: 'static + ?Sized,

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fn type_id(&self) -> TypeId

Gets the TypeId of self. Read more
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impl<T> Borrow<T> for T
where T: ?Sized,

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fn borrow(&self) -> &T

Immutably borrows from an owned value. Read more
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impl<T> BorrowMut<T> for T
where T: ?Sized,

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fn borrow_mut(&mut self) -> &mut T

Mutably borrows from an owned value. Read more
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impl<T> From<T> for T

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fn from(t: T) -> T

Returns the argument unchanged.

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impl<T, U> Into<U> for T
where U: From<T>,

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fn into(self) -> U

Calls U::from(self).

That is, this conversion is whatever the implementation of From<T> for U chooses to do.

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impl<T> IntoEither for T

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fn into_either(self, into_left: bool) -> Either<Self, Self>

Converts self into a Left variant of Either<Self, Self> if into_left is true. Converts self into a Right variant of Either<Self, Self> otherwise. Read more
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fn into_either_with<F>(self, into_left: F) -> Either<Self, Self>
where F: FnOnce(&Self) -> bool,

Converts self into a Left variant of Either<Self, Self> if into_left(&self) returns true. Converts self into a Right variant of Either<Self, Self> otherwise. Read more
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impl<T> Pointable for T

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const ALIGN: usize = _

The alignment of pointer.
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type Init = T

The type for initializers.
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unsafe fn init(init: <T as Pointable>::Init) -> usize

Initializes a with the given initializer. Read more
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unsafe fn deref<'a>(ptr: usize) -> &'a T

Dereferences the given pointer. Read more
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unsafe fn deref_mut<'a>(ptr: usize) -> &'a mut T

Mutably dereferences the given pointer. Read more
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unsafe fn drop(ptr: usize)

Drops the object pointed to by the given pointer. Read more
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impl<T> Same for T

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type Output = T

Should always be Self
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impl<SS, SP> SupersetOf<SS> for SP
where SS: SubsetOf<SP>,

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fn to_subset(&self) -> Option<SS>

The inverse inclusion map: attempts to construct self from the equivalent element of its superset. Read more
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fn is_in_subset(&self) -> bool

Checks if self is actually part of its subset T (and can be converted to it).
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fn to_subset_unchecked(&self) -> SS

Use with care! Same as self.to_subset but without any property checks. Always succeeds.
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fn from_subset(element: &SS) -> SP

The inclusion map: converts self to the equivalent element of its superset.
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impl<T> ToOwned for T
where T: Clone,

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type Owned = T

The resulting type after obtaining ownership.
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fn to_owned(&self) -> T

Creates owned data from borrowed data, usually by cloning. Read more
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fn clone_into(&self, target: &mut T)

Uses borrowed data to replace owned data, usually by cloning. Read more
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impl<T> ToString for T
where T: Display + ?Sized,

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default fn to_string(&self) -> String

Converts the given value to a String. Read more
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impl<T, U> TryFrom<U> for T
where U: Into<T>,

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type Error = Infallible

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.
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fn try_from(value: U) -> Result<T, <T as TryFrom<U>>::Error>

Performs the conversion.
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impl<T, U> TryInto<U> for T
where U: TryFrom<T>,

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type Error = <U as TryFrom<T>>::Error

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.
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fn try_into(self) -> Result<U, <U as TryFrom<T>>::Error>

Performs the conversion.
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impl<T> Scalar for T
where T: 'static + Clone + PartialEq + Debug,